And still, incredulity . . .

Image courtesy of cranky caregiver.wordpress.com

Image courtesy of cranky caregiver. wordpress.com

It happened again this morning.  At the end of the Today Programme (after the ‘real’ news) there was a feature on mindfulness in UK schools and its usefulness in helping young people to be aware of their conscious minds and of the stories they tell, and to be able to listen without judgement, focusing on the silences in between.  (Actually, the Head who spoke about it claimed it to be more like a self-taught CBT but to be fair, it’s not an easy concept to understand or to explain in the briefest of broadcast moments.)

But it was the presenter’s attitude that I noticed the most – one John Humphrys, known for his misplaced assumption that listeners’ understanding would be incomplete without his take on the news he relays.  He first scoffed at mindfulness as ‘some kind of yoga’, in a voice that betrayed his scorn, later expressing his incredulity that a practice aimed at improving young people’s thinking should be considered by the school head as ‘essential’.

Yoga classes are now so widespread that we could be forgiven for thinking that it has become a mainstream practice.  But beyond asana practice, yoga’s philosophy still appears to be little more than madness at the margins. Mindfulness and meditation remain the preserve of the old hippie. What a pity.  What a waste.  What a relief for those of us who know.  And what a job we have on our hands to encourage others to share our focus and our peace!

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Busy fools?

green traffic light

We’ve got a full on week ahead – two new outlets for our books and we take our first delivery of MyogaMarzipants (this year’s coolest look – on and off the yoga mat. Pictures soon). Admin mounts and so the iBook version of the MyogaManual will have to take a bit of a back seat (despite the fact I’m up to chapter 11 of 13) as we’re both pretty much occupied by the day jobs too.  It’s hectic. And it would be so easy to fall into the trap of becoming busy fools, running frantically around getting frazzled and enjoying very few of the little treasures each day offers if only we could slow down enough to see them.

My promise to myself?  To perform two activities a day with mindfulness. My favourites are (1) my morning shower and (2) eating cake – and of course my yoga practice.  Here’s hoping this will help with the busyness and make us more productive.  We can hope.